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Feces Can Change the World: Using Human Excreta as Fertilizer

Feces Can Change the World: Using Human Excreta as Fertilizer


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March 4, 2014

By

Food Tank

Waste management and soil scientists from all over the world met to discuss using human excretion to fertilize farms and gardens, drawing on a practice called "terra preta" from Amazonian Native Americans.


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?

Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.

Burke and Miller, from New Haven, VT, also brew and sell their own probiotic, using raw honey from their bee colony. They believe that a healthy dose of microbes contributes to their overall health.

“Research seems to show that the health of the microbiome is important,” says Miller. “And there is more going on there than we ever realized. It’s pretty exciting.”

Miller is right. Early research shows that a diverse and balanced microbiome -- the colony of microorganisms that make up the ecosystem of our body -- may be the key to good physical and mental health.

Americans have caught on, too. They spend more than $38 billion a year on probiotics in food, over-the-counter supplements, and creams in the hopes that these products will improve their gut bacteria and their health.

Doctors and consumers are using these lab-grown bacteria to boost their immune system, shorten a cold, and quell the symptoms of digestive disorders. Some doctors use probiotics -- available in many different strains -- to treat irritable bowel syndrome, antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and a stubborn infection that can be fatal in the elderly, C difficile. Some have even prescribed probiotics to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Others are drinking kombucha, as well as other popular fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, soft cheeses, and pickles in hopes they can boost levels of good bacteria in their digestive tract.

Can these products really improve your gut bacteria? And if they do, what does that mean for your health?


Watch the video: Φυσικό λίπασμα (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Ram

    Agree, it is a remarkable piece

  2. Nikus

    The nice message

  3. Antranig

    The article is excellent, the previous one is also very even

  4. Motilar

    Exactly you are right

  5. Jenny-Lee

    Great answer, bravo :)



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